Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Posctcards from China: an afternoon in Honcun

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

A cluster of little white-washed buildings nestled into the landscape of rural China.  Waterways, bridges, houses and trees artfully laid out to take on the shape of an ox: horns, intestines, legs and all.  When I found out it was the village where Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was shot, my inner film nerd was awakened: we didn’t have to think twice about hopping that crowded bus to Honcun.

Shoulder to shoulder we sat grinning in the back, barely able to contain the excitement to see it all for ourselves:

The narrow cobblestone streets

The aging facades made even more dramatic in afternoon sun.  Light and shade all shapes and angles

The perfect reflection of 1000 years in water like glass

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

 

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

Scenes from the ancient village of Honcun, in the Anhui region of China // UNESCO World Heritage site

How to get to Honcun from Tunxi:

The bus leaves from the Tunxi bus station, Gate 7. Once the bus gets rolling, they will collect 13 RMB/ person for the 1 hour ride that will take you to Yixian where you must transfer.

The Yixian bus stop is pretty much just an unmarked stop on the side of the road, so make sure you are paying attention to your transit times and any street signs… and double check with the driver before getting off the bus!

The ride from Yixian to Honcun is about 20 minutes and is 3 RMB/person.

To get back to Tunxi from Honcun, we stood on the corner where the bus originally dropped us off and kept our fingers crossed. One came through at 4pm, and we got the feeling that this was the last bus of the day.

3 thoughts on “Posctcards from China: an afternoon in Honcun

  1. Karen

    What fantastic pictures!!! Wow to walk those cobblestone that are centuries old…..they could tell so many stories. Thai you thank you! I love “walking” with you there?

    Reply

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